BRUISER and 3-SPEED driver

Set number 54416 ‘4×4 Vehicle Driver Figure Bruiser’ is available in the Hop-Up Options series; the driver for models with a 3-Speed or Bruiser chassis:

– Toyota Pick Up 4 x 4, model number 58028, put on sale in 1981 and available on the market until 1984; 3-Speed chassis,
– Blazing Blazer, model number 58029, put on sale in 1982 and available on the market until 1984; 3-Speed chassis,
– Toyota 4×4 Pick Up Bruiser, model number 58048, offered for sale in 1985 and available on the market until 1992; Bruiser chassis and
– Toyota 4×4 Pick Up Mountaineer, model number 58111, offered for sale in 1992 and available on the market until 1995; Bruiser chassis.

Included in the package is a manual for building the driver figure and installing it in the cockpit of the 3 Toyota Pick Up 4x4s. Using this set it is possible to assemble the passenger figure to complete the cockpit with just a few modifications.

The set includes the manual for constructing the driver

– central body,
– steering wheel,
– right arm divided into two parts,
– left arm divided into two parts,
– head without helmet divided into two parts and
– head complete with helmet divided into two parts.

The set allows a choice between the figure without the helmet and with the helmet. The version without the helmet is assembled for models with a closed cockpit (Toyota Pick Up 4 x 4 – model number 58028, Toyota 4×4 Pick Up Bruiser – model number 58048 and Toyota 4×4 Pick Up Mountaineer – model number 58111) and the version with the helmet is assembled for models with an open cockpit (Blazing Blazer, model number 58029).

Helmet
These are the parts involved in the construction of the helmetless driver figure.

Use pure acetone and acetone + ABS solution to assemble the various parts of the body correctly.
Acetone and its solution fuse the parts together, which then become a single piece: the figure is stronger, and the solution is useful for closing any gaps and harmonising the lines of the body. List of materials required

– wire cutters and an iron saw for cutting the parts,
– wooden and metal clips to hold the parts in place,
– pure acetone, less dense acetone and ABS solution and denser acetone and ABS solution,
– brush for applying acetone and its solution.

Sequence of pictures showing the construction stages of the driver:

– cut with the cutter and select the chosen parts (in this case the head without helmet, body and arms),
– if necessary, finish the parts with 400 grit sandpaper,
– test the correct installation of the two parts forming the left and right arms,
– apply a thin film of acetone on both contact lines of the right arm,
– apply the thicker acetone solution along the contact lines between the two parts,
– join the two parts forming the right arm by holding them in place with a wooden clothes peg and
– repeat the same operations with the left arm.

Remove the wooden clothes pegs only after waiting enough time for the Acetone and ABS solution to set, suggested timing: after half an hour the parts are joined enough to hold their position without the aid of external supports. Complete fusion of the parts occurs on average after 6 hours; the timing depends on the amount of solution applied. After this phase, proceed as follows

– apply alternating coats of dense and less dense solution to the joint line of both the right and left arm to close any possible gaps,
– wait 6 hours for the solution to solidify and, if necessary, apply further coats of Acetone and ABS solution with the brush so as to conceal the joint line. Shape the solution with the brush in such a way that the folds of the arms are taken up.

Perform the same operations with the two half-shells forming the head.
Sequence of images showing the stages of joining the two arms and the head with the central body:

– start with the head, applying a generous coat of thick acetone and ABS solution at the point where the head joins the body at the base of the neck,
– place the head on the body and apply light pressure to join the parts, shape the excess solution with a brush soaked in acetone to best harmonise the shape of the neck,
– wait 6 hours for the solution to set and
– repeat the same operations for the right and left arms. When positioning the arms, take care to avoid problems during the painting phase: the arms must not be too close to the body otherwise it is impossible to apply the colour and the hands must be positioned so that they can grip the steering wheel. When positioning the arm after applying the solution, you have time to reposition the part before the solution sets. Use this time to find the right position for the part.

Passenger
The parts involved and the techniques for constructing the passenger are always the same as those involved for the driver seat.
The different shape of the seat does not allow the passenger to occupy the space correctly, it is necessary to work the left side of the base of the figure by cutting the triangle highlighted in the figure.
In this way the passenger can ‘sit’ correctly on the settee, the figure becomes asymmetrical.

Sequence of images showing the construction phases of the driver, this phase takes up many steps in the construction of the driver:

– cut with the cutter and select the chosen parts (in this case they are the head without helmet, body and arms),
– if necessary, finish the parts with 400 grit sandpaper,
– test the correct installation of the two parts forming the left and right arms,
– cut off the left and right forearms respectively with an iron saw, as shown in the figure,
– apply a thin film of acetone on both contact lines of the right forearm,
– apply the thicker acetone solution along the contact lines between the two parts,
– join the two parts forming right forearm by holding them in place with a wooden clothes peg,
– there is no figure for the passenger. The difference between the passenger and the driver is the position of the hands, using the acetone solution join the right forearm with the right hand so that the hand has a more natural position for a passenger than for a driver. The driver must grip the steering wheel, while the passenger might have his hands in different positions; the hand might be resting on his legs or the passenger might have his arm outstretched to pick up objects from the dashboard,
– repeat the same operations with left forearm,
– remove the wooden clothes pegs only after waiting the necessary time for the Acetone and ABS solution to set, suggested timing: after half an hour the parts are joined enough to hold their position without the aid of external supports. Complete fusion of the parts occurs on average after 6 hours; the timing depends on the amount of solution applied,
– apply alternating coats of dense and less dense solution to the joint line of both the right and left arm to close any possible gaps, and
– wait 6 hours for the solution to solidify and, if necessary, apply additional coats of Acetone and ABS solution with the brush to conceal the joint line. Shape the solution with the brush in such a way that the folds of the arms are picked up.

Picture sequence showing how to join the various parts forming the passenger figure:

– apply a generous coat of thick acetone and ABS solution at the point where the head joins the body at the base of the neck,
– place the head on the body and apply light pressure to join the parts, shape the excess solution with a brush soaked in acetone to best harmonise the shape of the neck,
– wait 6 hours for the solution to set and
– repeat the same operations for the right and left arms. When positioning the arms, take care to avoid problems when painting: the arms must not be too close to the body, otherwise it is impossible to apply the paint, and the hands must be positioned in such a way that they can simulate a real movement for a passenger. When positioning the arm after applying the solution, you have time to reposition the part before the solution sets. Use this time to find the right position for the part.

Note the different position of the passenger’s hands (left) compared to the driver’s (right).

Cockpit
If you decide to build only the driver figure, no modifications to the cockpit are necessary. It is simple to join the parts using the nut and bolt that is located between the driver’s legs under the steering wheel.

If you want to proceed by adding the passenger figure, you must modify the cockpit seat, a sequence of pictures showing the steps to adapt the cockpit from one to two seats:

– draw a line perpendicular to the axis of the car that passes through the driver hole, a hole that serves to secure the driver to the seat with a nut and bolt,
– along this line, measure the distance separating the hole for locking the driver from the cockpit side,
– replicate the same measurement on the passenger side by marking the distance taken on the driver side (approx. 35 mm) and
– drill the cockpit floor at this point with a 3 mm diameter drill bit.

With this modification, the cockpit can now accommodate a driver and passenger.

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